Content Marketing

Rise Above The Noise

Content marketing provides substance instead of noise. By using improved metrics, you can better understand your audience and provide them with content that engages them.

Just as you optimize for search engines as a means to an ends, you provide compelling content to rank higher in search results, but with the end goals of reaching your audience and developing an online presence that helps you brand your company by branding yourself.

To foil manipulative internet marketers, search engines now use formulas to downgrade sites providing little content and thus poor user experience. As a result, the internet has become more content-driven. Text, video, photos, sound, graphs, and numbers all make up the content of the internet.

The internet feeds us with data like never before, but when people feel bombarded with advertising, they insulate against noise. If you can provide compelling content that rises above the noise to answer that all-important user question—What’s In It For Me?—then your target audience members will permit you to market to them.

Encourage User Engagement

Traditional marketing is about content generation and distribution while content marketing also considers how to feed into the audience’s needs and wants, make content searchable, monitor outcome, and revise strategy as needed.

When you do it right, by providing content that resonates, gives value, and provides something your audience can act on, this type of marketing leads to user engagement.

Your direct dialogue with customers is more powerful than anything your customer service staff can do, simply because you are the CEO. Your interaction with your customers is better training than any workshop your staff can attend. Your choice of one product or action over another explains your values. Your excitement about the next launch can be a powerful marketing tool.

Start With A Pilot Project

Google Yourself, CEO addresses the issues of budget and staffing, with suggestions about how to sell content marketing to your board. It details how to make content development a manageable, measurable process, starting with a pilot project.

Since you already wear many hats as a CEO, you probably need to outsource your content creation, distribution, and evaluation. The book outlines a dream team to support you in this effort. Plentiful links let you explore content marketing in more detail.

Moreover, the book helps you understand how to package information for different sites, provides questions to help you develop a social media strategy, and walks you through different presentation options—blogs, newsletters, infographics, videos, podcasts, and more.

Buy the book at Saxo.com.

By Isabella Lo